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Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton

Representing the District of Columbia

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Norton Appointed by Pelosi to Serve on Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission Established by Norton’s Bill

Nov 16, 2017
Press Release

Pelosi Also Appoints Douglass’ Great-Great-Great Grandson

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The office of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) today said that Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has appointed Norton to serve on the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission, which was established by Norton’s bill (Public Law 115-77).  The commission will plan, develop and carry out programs and activities to honor and celebrate the life of Frederick Douglass, the country’s greatest slavery abolitionist, during the bicentennial anniversary of his birth, in 2018.  Douglass’ home at Cedar Hill in Southeast Washington, D.C. is an official National Historic Site, which attracts thousands of visitors annually.  Leader Pelosi also appointed Kenneth Morris, Jr., Douglass’ great-great-great grandson, to the commission.  Norton’s bill specified that the House Minority Leader would appoint two members of the commission, at least one of whom must be a Member of the House.

“I thank Leader Pelosi for selecting me to serve on the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission,” Norton said.  “I am particularly pleased that she also has appointed Kenneth Morris, Jr., the great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass, whose knowledge of Douglass’ legacy is unequaled.  I look forward to the bipartisan work of planning a fitting celebration in honor of one of the greatest Americans in history, including events here in the District of Columbia, which Douglass called home for most of his adult life.”

The commission’s other 14 members will be appointed as follows:

  • Two members appointed by the President.
  • Four members appointed by the President on the recommendation of each of the Mayor of the District of Columbia and the Governors of Maryland, Massachusetts and New York.
  • Three members, at least one of whom must be a Member of the House, appointed by the Speaker of the House.
  • Three members, at least one of whom must be a Senator, appointed by the Senate Majority Leader.
  • Two members, at least one of whom must be a Senator, appointed by the Senate Minority Leader.

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